Tag: Triathlete

Tips to Become a Successful Multisport Athlete: #10 Visualization/Believing

Visualization/Believing
The great athletes know when they have given their best, put in the time, listened to their bodies and believe that they are ready. They show up on race day to execute what they have prepared to do all season and nothing distracts them from this mission. The race becomes the “easy” part because the “hard” work has already been done. They have mentally and physically prepared themselves for their race and have no doubts. I know an athlete is ready when they can give me a detailed description of how their race will unfold to a T. They have it all lined up, have visualized it over and over and know exactly how they will feel, look and breathe each step of the way.

Train on, keep believing, follow your journey.

If you are interested in beginning training, or you are ready to take your training to the next level, contact Teresa Nelson to begin.

Tips to Become a Successful Multisport Athlete: #9 REST

REST
Great athletes know when it is time to REST. It is a balance of work, family, play and train. Athletes forget to REST when training is not calling and good athletes know when it is time to put the legs up . Recovery is also the additional element on swim/bike/run!

If you are interested in beginning training, or you are ready to take your training to the next level, contact Teresa Nelson to begin.

Tips to Become a Successful Multisport Athlete: #8 Communication and Logging Workouts

Communication and Logging Workouts
Documenting your journey, your workouts, your successes during training, along with the things that didn’t go so well, helps you and your coach see where you are going and what can be improved. If you look back on track workouts from months prior or the year prior and see your improvements then it should give you that extra confidence to know you are showing improvements. Most athletes use the races alone to determine their success, as a coach we see the stuff going on day in and day out that are making you a better athlete. Write down your journey, it is fun to look back to see how far you have come.

If you are interested in beginning training, or you are ready to take your training to the next level, contact Teresa Nelson to begin.

Tips to Become a Successful Multisport Athlete: #7 The Journey

The Journey
Athletes come into the season excited, ready to train, wanting to give it their all. It is usually the coach that is telling them to hold back. Success does not come overnight, it is a process and the athlete that recognizes this as a journey to their goals and takes on their training with patience recognizes several things along the way. There are highs and lows. Athletes that take on these challenges are the ones that find the reward at the end of the season. Too often athletes want to go, go, go and they are missing the fun and the journey along the way, before they know it they have run themselves into the ground and are done before their season even starts.

If you are interested in beginning training, or you are ready to take your training to the next level, contact Teresa Nelson to begin.

Tips to Become a Successful Multisport Athlete: #6 Listening to Your Body

Listening to Your Body
This is for in training and in racing. Recognizing signals that something is “off” and dealing with it.

Your training program is a guideline, but if something feels “tweaky” knowing that your body needs a break at that time rather than trying to push through the workout to “do more” can lead to injury later. As for racing, listen to your body cues and respond to them appropriately instead of waiting until it is too late (ie: fueling properly, pacing well, and staying on your game plan for the day).

If you are interested in beginning training, or you are ready to take your training to the next level, contact Teresa Nelson to begin.

Tips to Become a Successful Multisport Athlete: #5 Considering Factors and Elements

Considering Factors and Elements
From experience, I can tell you that no race is the same, even if it is the same race from the previous year. In the sport of Triathlon, there are so many variables on the course that play a roll on race day. Bouys drift, swim distances are mis-marked, winds blow in all directions at different times and shifting intensities, road surfaces change with weather, etc. The good athlete considers these elements before beating themselves up over not getting a PR or not showing time improvements. In fact, the good athlete keeps their head in the game at these times, while the less experienced athlete throws in the towel before the race is even complete. Mentally prepare yourself for all conditions so there are no surprises on race day!

If you are interested in beginning training, or you are ready to take your training to the next level, contact Teresa Nelson to begin.

Tips to Become a Successful Multisport Athlete: #4 Racing in Prep for “A” Races

Racing in Prep for “A” Races
Too many times athletes are caught up in PR’ing at every race and not considering the factors, the elements, and most importantly not recognizing that this is not their “A” race. Yes, you can PR in a non-“A” race, but the main goal is to get out there, learn more about yourself and your race tactics to prepare for the big season “A” race.

If you are interested in beginning training, or you are ready to take your training to the next level, contact Teresa Nelson to begin.

Tips to Become a Successful Multisport Athlete: #3 Comparisons

Comparisons
It’s all about competition right? So many athletes think that one “less than perfect” practice means they are not progressing. Once again comparing yourself to others on the track, at a bike ride, etc. really should not mean anything to you, or your coach. If you are following your game plan then you should reach your “A” race prepared and ready. If you are chasing down someone in training to get the “win “ for the day, then you are venturing from your plan and possibly causing interruption to the weeks workouts ahead. Compare yourself to YOU, by following your training journal and listening to your coach.

If you are interested in beginning training, or you are ready to take your training to the next level, contact Teresa Nelson to begin.

Tips to Become a Successful Multisport Athlete: #2 Following Their Plan

Following their plan
Coaching a team is fun, but an athlete comparing themselves on a daily basis to their team mates is super detrimental, more mentally than anything. A coach prescribes a program for YOU as the athlete, if another athlete is doing more volume in their training, then that is what their coach feels they need. Don’t measure your training program against another athlete’s without fully understanding the coaches goals for them. More is not always better and the coach is considering several other factors when designing each athlete’s schedule. So it is best to follow your plan, your heart rate and your workout goals. Stay focused and don’t be concerned about what others are doing.

If you are interested in beginning training, or you are ready to take your training to the next level, contact Teresa Nelson to begin.

Tips to Become a Successful Multisport Athlete: #1 Consistency

There have been a handful of commonalities I have seen in athletes throughout 9 years of coaching that have lead to some reaching success or their goals sooner than others. Not one tip makes an athlete better than another, it is just a common base of similarities that has been recognized amongst athletes.

Consistency.
Making your training a priority regularly, starting early with base building and continually making your training a habit has lead to many athletes reaching their successes. Several athletes use the procrastination technique due to online programs such as 12 weeks to your first half ironman and such, and as this does get many to the starting line it is eliminating the importance of base training and there is very little room for error with such a short time frame (ie: illness, injury, etc.). When an athlete has been training consistently, lost time tends to have little to no effect on their performance due to the solid base they have established with their base training methodology.

If you are interested in beginning training, or you are ready to take your training to the next level, contact Teresa Nelson to begin.