Tag: youth

Seattle Urban Squash’s first ever Sox Hop Disco Dance

Dear Members,

You and your friends are cordially invited to a night of Disco Dancing at Seattle Urban Squash’s first ever Sox Hop Disco on November 5th at

8:00 PM. Join us on the basketball courts at Seattle Athletic Club Downtown!

Some of you may have already seen young kids practicing on Squash Courts or huddled together studying intently as you rush past them towards your next gym class. Seattle Urban Squash (SUS), a 501(C)3 Public Charity working in association with our Seattle Athletic Clubs, is providing a comprehensive after school education, athletics, and community service program for kids from low-income families, creating pathways for higher education and a lifetime of opportunities. Kids face numerous challenges at school, but hardships faced by their families at home make it increasingly hard for them, potentially limiting their access to opportunities many of us take for granted. SUS staffers and volunteers work diligently year in and year out with a select group of kids starting from elementary school to help them focus on their studies, hone their game of Squash, and get involved in servicing their communities. In the process, our scholar athletes acquire crucial lifelong skills – commitment, diligence, resilience, integrity, and teamwork. In just the past 3 years since our inception, our students have significantly and consistently increased their reading and math abilities. We have averaged over 98% attendance across

250 hours of practice, community service projects, and field trips annually! As we kick-off our 4th academic year of this innovative and highly successful program, we invite you to join SUS at their informational and fundraising dance party to be held at Seattle Athletic Club Downtown Basketball Court on Saturday, November 5th, 2016 at 8 pm till late. The ticket prices are $30 and include a light buffet dinner, a drink ticket and a formal DJ to get you grooving to good old Sox Hop Disco party tunes (no hard sole or heeled shoes please!).

You will find the registration forms at our reception desks; please reach out to SUS staff directly for more information or sign-up online at

www.seattlesquash.org/events/2016/11/5/sus-soxhopdisco-party. Spread the word, bring your friends, and enjoy the evening for a good cause!

We look forward to seeing you groove with us!If you wish to learn more or volunteer in the Urban Squash program, please check out our website at

http://seattlesquash.org or email us at info@seattlesquash.org.

Summer Youth Yoga

Month of July:

  • Saturdays – 9th, 16th, 30th| 10:00 am |  $50/kid, (for drop-in special – email Melissa for more details)
  • Wednesdays –  6th, 13th, 20th, 27th | 1:00pm | $85/kid (for drop-in special – email Melissa for more details)

Why Summer Youth Yoga?

  •   Develops motor skills and coordination
  •   Increases strength, balance, and flexibility
  •   Enhance self-awareness and focus
  •   Reduces stress and provides methods for coping and self-soothing

 

Children ages 5+ are welcome.  All sessions are adapted to each child’s individual needs.  A minimum of 4 sign-ups are needed to run the class.

  • Please contact Melissa for more details on signing up. Accounts will be charged for late cancellations and no-shows.

 

For more information or sign-up, please contact personal fitness trainer Melissa Barasona at mbarasona@sacdt.com.

Teen Training

Sport specific workouts for your teen.

  • Are you looking to give your teen that high school or college advantage to make them the best player possible?
  • Do you ever worry about your teen’s workout habits?
  • Is weight training too much for their joints?
  • Should they be doing that much cardio?

Let our certified personal trainers work with your teen for 60 minutes twice a week giving them proper coaching for lifts, agility training, and sports specific movements. Your teen will be given a written manual which emphasizes the importance of flexibility, strength training, and speed/agility training.

  • $360 per teen for 4 weeks of instruction and training.
  • $220 per teen if you bring a friend with you (the rate if there are 2-3 teens in each workout)


For more information and to reserve a spot for your youth, please contact Fitness Director Jacob Galloway at jgalloway@sacdt.com.

STRENGTH TRAINING FOR YOUTH ATHLETES

Most parents know that strength training is an essential component of maximizing their child’s athletic potential but many don’t know when to start said training. When asked this question I like to refer to the ACSM research article that states, “Generally speaking, if children are ready for participation in organized sports or activities — such as Little League baseball, soccer, or gymnastics — then they are ready for some type of strength training.” If you feel your child has the emotional maturity to take part in an organized sport then they are perfectly capable of taking up strength training with a qualified professional.

One concern many have is that strength training will negatively affect bone growth in youth athletes. This is a myth that is taking much too long to go away. There hasn’t been documentation of this actually occurring while there is in fact ample evidence to the contrary. Strength training has been shown to actually increase bone density, peak bone mass and bone strength.

Strength is the only physical attribute that has a direct impact on all other areas of athletic performance and has the highest potential for growth when compared to other qualities such as power and speed. In an article from the Mayo Clinic the author states that when done properly, strength training can:

  • Increase your child’s muscle strength and endurance
  • Help protect your child’s muscles and joints from sports-related injuries
  • Improve your child’s performance in nearly any sport, from dancing and figure skating to football and soccer
  • Develop proper techniques that your child can continue to use as he or she grows older
  • Strengthen your child’s bones

A properly designed program for a youth athlete must be created and executed by a qualified coach and of course I am partial to myself because of my education, credentials, and experience. Currently my youngest client is a 12 year old basketball/football player whose performance has skyrocketed since he started strength training. I have also worked with the Skyline High School Girls Basketball team, the Bellevue High School Track team, and many individual youth athletes from around the area competing in lacrosse, football, basketball, baseball, soccer, and even cheerleading.

 
I have seen over and over again what strength training can do for a young athlete and have come up with some guidelines that can serve any coach or parent working with young athletes.

General Guidelines for Strength Training Youth Athletes:

1. Master the basics while focusing on proper movement patterns. With young athletes it is best to first master general movement patterns and body weight exercises before moving on to more advanced strength training modalities. Great exercises include: jumping/landing, med-ball throwing, body weight squats, push-ups, pull-ups, and sled pushing/pulling.

2. Use proper loading parameters. Strength training doesn’t always mean loading up a squat bar and going as heavy as possible. As a general rule with young athletes it’s best to stick with body weight exercises or exercises with loads that allow the athlete to complete 8 to 20 repetitions each set. As the athlete advances the intensity of exercises can advance as well.

3. Teach proper force absorption. Learning how to properly land and decelerate will be invaluable in preventing future sports injuries for any athlete. Deceleration is also a crucial factor in agility performance.

4. Don’t specialize too early. Young athletes should build as broad an athletic base as possible in order to maximize athletic potential. Performing only exercises that seem “sport specific” is not an effective way to build an athletic base. While this might make for a good basketball or soccer player now, it will actually do them a disservice for their athletic future. Specializing early is also a great way to burn a kid out on a sport.

5. Make it fun! Strength training should be something that the kids look forward to and enjoy. This is an opportunity to set them up to not only maximize their athletic potential but also create life-long healthy habits. If your kid does not enjoy training they won’t reap maximum benefits and will likely discontinue training at the first opportunity they get.

I started seriously strength training for sports at 15 years old and I only wish I would have started sooner. At that time I started working with a strength coach named Mike Seilo, and I am not exaggerating when I say he changed trajectory of my athletic and eventually my professional career. Strength training with a qualified coach dramatically increased my athletic performance and without Mike I don’t think I would have gone on to compete in track and field at the collegiate level. Outside of improving my sport performance Mike influenced me to become strength coach and work with young athletes. Mike’s influence on me went way beyond sport performance and I can only hope to have the same influence on kids during my career.

Under the right supervision strength training can be a huge benefit to any young athlete. Not only will they improve athletically, they may learn some valuable lessons that serve them inside and outside of the gym as well as develop life-long personal relationships. If you have a child involved in athletics I highly recommend you find a qualified coach and get their strength training career underway.

If you have any questions regarding youth strength training please contact PFT Tom Sheriff CSCS (tsheriff@sacdt.com)
206-443-1111 ext. 292.

Resistance Training for Children

For years there has been a belief that resistance training was inappropriate or even dangerous for children. This belief stems from a study performed in the 1970’s by a group of Japanese researchers that observed juvenile workers that were subjected to many hours of lifting and moving heavy objects. On average these children were shorter than their non-working counterparts. Through this observation they concluded that it was the heavy lifting at such a young age that had a negative effect on their epiphyseal plate, and in turn, resulted in a stunted growth. However, recently there has been a growing amount of evidence that suggests that resistance training for children is not only safe, but can be highly beneficial.

Researchers from the Institute of Training Science and Sports Informatics published a study that analyzed 60 years worth of studies involving children and weightlifting. The researchers found that virtually all of the children and adolescents benefited from weight training. Interestingly enough, although the older kids did have greater strength gains, compared to the younger kids the difference wasn’t significant. This study also found that, contrary to popular belief, there was no sizable difference in strength increases once the children hit puberty. There was however a difference in hypertrophy (increase in muscle mass) that was likely due to the amount of testosterone in the adolescent population. Because of the lack of noticeable size gains in children, many researchers in the past had concluded that weightlifting wasn’t an effective training method for the youth.

So how young is too young to start resistance training? The jury is still out on this question, though most scientific literature seems to point to ages 6-8. Resistance training at this age should involve body weight exercises or very light loads with emphasis on control and form. Squats using a wooden dowel or push-ups are a common method of training children at this age. Heavy loads (without proper progression) or exercises that involve ballistic movements should be avoided when training children.

For more information on youth resistance training please contact Will Paton.