Tag: video

Sitting is not only bad for adults

Hello fellow SAC members,

You may have heard how continuous sitting or undisrupted sitting for long period of time (1+hour) is not good for one’s overall health, don’t forget the effect of sitting can affect our younger generation, too!

This article from the NY Times highlight some points on how sitting can adversely affect the young ones and I think those points apply to us too!

 

I generally recommend one to change position during sitting every 20 minutes, especially for those with low back pain and sciatica, to spare the shearing force on the lumbar spine disc. Now let’s get those young couch potatoes off their rears and start moving!

 

Move better to feel better,

Dr. Li

Here’s the article from NY Times:

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/09/23/sitting-is-bad-for-children-too/?src=me

Dr. Li has been taking care of the SAC staff and members since 2010. You can find him at the lobby performing injury screen for members every 3rd Tuesday of the month. His practice, Mobility Plus Sports Rehab, is conveniently located about 10 minute walks from the SAC. You can find out more about him and his clinic at mobilityplussportsrehab.com. He can be reached by info@mobilityplussportsrehab.com.  

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“Core” Value

Hello fellow SAC members,

Phew, what a summer so far! Today, I want to share with you from what I learned from the world-famous spine researches, Dr. Stuart McGill, from the University of Waterloo in Canada. I had the pleasure of working with Dr. McGill the past couple years, and want to share his knowledge with you. In the video (link below), you will find Dr. McGill “de-mystified” a lot of the usual “core” exercises. If you are experiencing low back pain, you will find the video even more intriguing.

Want to learn more about what Dr. McGill said about exercising and how they would apply to your workout routine? Email me 😉   Enjoy!

Dr. Li

Dr. Stuart McGill’s video from NY Times:

http://www.nytimes.com/video/magazine/1194841000095/core-values.html

Dr. Li has been taking care of the SAC staff and members since 2010. You can find him at the lobby performing injury screen for members every 3rd Tuesday of the month. His practice, Mobility Plus Sports Rehab, is conveniently located about 10 minute walk from the SAC. You can find out more about him and his clinic at mobilityplussportsrehab.com. He can be reached by info@mobilityplussportsrehab.com.  

 

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Wall T4 mobilization

Hello, hope all of you are staying active and healthy. Today, I would like to introduce you a great stretch I showed to a lot of my patients, especially the ones who need to sit a lot all day. This “stretch” will help move your mid-back (thoracic spine), which is the place I find most folks having stiffness at. Do this exercise about 10-12 rep/set, 3-4x/day. You will find yourself standing taller by end of a work day instead of slumping. Enjoy!

 

You can find the exercise video here:

 

http://mobilityplussportsrehab.com/active-rehab/videos-upper-back/

 

 

Dr. Li has been taking care of the SAC staff and members since 2010. You can find him at the lobby performing injury screen for members every 3rd Tuesday of the month. His practice, Mobility Plus Sports Rehab, is conveniently located about 10 minute walk from the SAC. You can find out more about him and his clinic at mobilityplussportsrehab.com. He can be reached by info@mobilityplussportsrehab.com.  

 

 

Stretching 102 Video: How to Target Your Calves, Inner & Outer Thighs and Large Hip Muscles

This video of a three-part series addresses different stretch techniques including: static, active, dynamic and resistance stretching by demonstrating some basic stretches for the calves, inner/outer thighs and large hip muscles.

When assessing when a certain stretch technique should be used, there is no right or wrong answer; however, here is what I recommend to my clients.

Static stretching should be done once a muscle is thoroughly warmed up. I recommend it primarily after your resistance workout following a cool down. If you decide to static stretch before a workout, make sure you do a long warm up prior.

Active stretching can also be done before a workout after a warm up, or in place of one. This technique is used a lot with team sports and group fitness. It’s a great and safe way to get multiple muscles firing and create length in muscles that are tight before beginning a work out. I also use it with clients to reinforce proper movement patterns before adding weight to them, and with some clients this can be used as a workout itself.

Dynamic stretching can also be included as a warm up if you are outside doing a sport. I recommend at least a small warm up (walk/jog) before attempting these moves. Ballistic movements have a higher risk of injury, but also can produce good lubrication in the joints in multiple planes of motion. These stretches also mimick the natural plyometric movements of the body, so it is good preparation before a sport.

Resistance (Ki-Hara) stretching is fairly new. It has a medicinal benefit in that it allows you to stretch more of the muscle belly versus the tendons. Stretching the tendon is typical if you have a very short, impeded movement pattern. Professional athletes, like Dara Torres, use it regularly. It would be best after a workout, or on a day you aren’t working out because you will have increased blood flow to the muscle.

– PNF (Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation) and basic assisted stretching are done with a trainer. PNF is along the same principles as resistance stretching only you squeeze the opposing muscle group isometrically, which shuts off (inhibits) the target muscle from resisting the stretch, and then relax as you are assisted into the stretch. During assisted stretching you can squeeze the target muscle in an isometric contraction to push blood into it, and then follow it with a relaxation during the stretch. These techniques I am more than happy to give you an introduction to if you would like further details.

Yoga Pose of the Month: Post Workout Stretches

This month, the Yoga Pose of the Month is actually a simple series of four basic “feel good” yoga poses for a post work out stretch.

The first, Downward Facing Dog (Adho Muka Svasana), is a yoga classic. It’s purpose is to stretch all the major posterior muscle groups, as you strengthen your core, and let oxygenated blood flow to your brain.

The second is Pigeon (Raja Kapotasana) which is designed to create flexibility in the hips, glutes and inner thighs.

The third, Bridge Pose (Setu Bhandasana) will open the muscles of the chest and create flexibility in the anterior body, as well as strengthen your back side if you push firmly into the floor and fire up your hamstrings and glutes.

The final, Resting Pose (Svasana) is an important piece to muscle recovery as it allows the body and mind to be totally still, and feel the wonderful effects of your workout and deep relaxation of Yoga Asana.