Tag: TN Multisports

Meet Himanshu Kale – Ironman in Training!

Himanshu Kale joined Seattle Athletic Club at the end of July 2012. His goal: to complete a half Iron Man triathlon; his obstacle: he could barely swim! When we met that week for an initial complementary swim assessment, I found he had a lot of anxiety around the water. Like many with water anxieties, Himanshu did not trust that he could put is face and head in the water. However, I soon found that Himanshu had a lot more willingness to work through his fears and anxieties in order to achieve his goals. He was ready and willing to learn the fundamentals first: to start from the most elementary and foundational place: putting his face in the water practicing blowing air out of his body. Beginning with learning to breathe properly and gradually adding one technique on at a time, Himanshu has developed a technically strong freestyle stroke.

Many people who never learned to swim develop a fear and anxieties around the water simply because they’ve never been in it, making learning more challenging. Others have experienced traumatic events, leaving them with emotional scares of swimming. For all these people, learning to swim is such an act of courage. When they commit to this skill, however, the reward is a life changing shift in their entire perspective of their place in the world. Himanshu took on this challenge.

In November he ran his first half marathon. In December he started working out in my Swim Conditioning class and soon joined TN Multi Sports! There he is able to work on his conditioning and prepare for his first triathlons.

Now, when Himanshu and I meet, we focus on continuing to improve his technique, learn the other strokes and turns, and continue to work through any lingering fears that come up as we introduce new dimensions to his swimming repertoire.

Himanshu’s success is remarkable especially in such a relatively short period of time. I am honored to work with him and look forward to watching him reach his ultimate goal of completing a half Iron Man in June 2012.

Working with Himanshu has been an honor, making me especially proud.

10 Tips to Prepare for Your First Triathlon

  1. Research! Know the distances and the course. As a newbie short distance are best to start with. The more prepared you are the less worry and anxiety you will have on race day. If you can practice on the course ahead of time then do it. Or drive the course so you know what to expect. If you are unable to do either then at the very least study the course maps, elevations, and go to your pre-race meeting with any questions.
  2. Practice swimming in the open water. Many athletes are very comfortable in the pool but the open water throws many new elements at you. Buddy up and practice ahead of time. If you are wearing a wetsuit make sure to practice in it at least 2-3 times before race day.
  3. Determine your race gear early and practice in it! This includes shoes, race kit, hat, etc. Get comfortable with your attire!
  4. Bring “extras”. Extra clothing on race day to stay warm and to change into post race, extra food to munch, and extra fluids to sip before race.
  5. Seek advice from experienced coaches/athletes. Pick 1-3 trusted sources and learn from them. Use their advice to help guide your training and racing strategies.
  6. Practice running off the bike often. This is a big shocker if you don’t practice it. Even just running for 10-15’ after each bike ride will make a difference come race day.
  7. Don’t try anything new on race day. No need to change your sports-nutrition, your breakfast, or attire, etc on game day. It is easy to get caught up in what everyone else is doing. When race day comes, everything should have been tested and dialed in. Follow your game plan.
  8. Pick a location to meet your friends/family post race. It can get busy and the worst is not being able to find your loved ones after a phenomenal race!
  9. Get your bike tuned. Make sure your bike gears, chain ring, tires, etc are cleaned and up to date. Make sure to book your tune-up appointment early to ensure the shop can get you in!
  10. Have fun!!! Race day is about celebrating!

2012 Postal Swim Recap & Results

Our Annual One-hour Postal Swim took place on January 29, 2012 at Mercerwood Shore Club. Seattle Athletic Club Downtown members took on the challenge to swim as far as they could in one hour with their friends and teammates taking splits and counting laps along the way. The results are mailed, hence the title “postal”, into USMS (United States Masters Swimming) to be ranked nationally amongst other dedicated swimmers. All results are posted in yards. Several swimmers were participating for their second or third year in a row, others for swam for their first time ever. It’s a fun, challenging, event that swimmers look forward to each year!

Congratulations to our following members!

Chad Baker – 3636
Victoria Boivin – 3510*
Tom Camp – 2991*
Addy Davis – 3325
Dustin Gilbert – 3582
Karissa Lackey – 3746
Elizabeth Martin – 3488*
Patricia Nakamura – 3336
Teresa Nelson – 4817*
Kirsten Nesholm – 2688*
Lisa Ohge – 3237*
Mike Podell – 3349
Darin Smith – 3150
John Strayer – 3321
Natalie Swistak – 3631*
Mark Webb – 3844*

The above figures are yards swam during the 2012 Postal Swim. Asterisk (*) denotes improvements in distance from previous Postal Swim results.

Swim Conditioning classes at Seattle Athletic Club Downtown are a great way to improve upon your swim fitness and technique. Contact Coach Teresa Nelson at tnelson@sacdt.com with any questions.

Hawaii 70.3 Triathlon – SAC Athlete Results

On Saturday, June 4th Seattle Athletic Club was represented in Kona, Hawaii at the Hawaii 70.3 triathlon. The course consisted of a 1.2 mile ocean swim, a 56 mile bike ride on the Ironman championship course with the winds and heat delivering as always, and a 13.1 mile run through the Mauna Lani golf course with a spectacular view of the ocean.

Each athlete trained and worked hard utilizing the coaches, the swim conditioning, cycle class, pilates lessons, and massage therapist at the SAC. Congrats to the following members/employees:

  • Bridget Jones – 5:05 and 5th in her division qualifying her for the Vegas World 70.3 championships.
  • Mark Webb – 4:46 for his fastest 70.3 to date and a great lead-up to Ironman CDA in just a few short weeks.
  • Tom Camp – 6:11. So much stronger with more experience going into the race this year!
  • Amanda Camp – Had an amazing performance dropping time in all three disciples from the previous year and landing herself a finish time of 6:38.
  • Kirsten Nesholm – Broke 6 hours with fantastic overall performance with a finish time of 5:50.
  • Bri Cooper – Stayed strong and positive after switching out 3 flats in the heat of Hawaii. Way to finish proudly! 6:48 (and with 42 minutes of flat tires).
  • Karissa Lackey- Had an amazingly quick swim and bike! Finishing in 6:11.

If you are interested in training with a team or individual coaching please contact Teresa Nelson for more information.

Seattle Athletic Club Runners Take on the Mercer Island Half Marathon!

Let the race season begin!!!

Kicking off the 2011 local race season, we had an amazing showing at the Mercer Island 5K, 10K and half Marathon. And a super kick-off it was with over 32 athletes racing, we were a pack to be reckoned with! The sun was shining and so were all of our athletes with some superb performances! Plenty of fantastic races, course PR’s, top placements, and race debuts made it a very memorable day for all!

While there was plenty of pre and post race laughter and kidding around, the MI courses are no joke! The courses have more ups, downs, turns, and bends in them than a roller-coaster! And just when you think that you have hit all the hills and rollers you could, there is that last little steep climb to the finish that is placed there like a bad joke but oh so exhilarating when you crest the top and sprint that 30yds down to the finish line!

Congrats to all of those who raced your performances were amazing and inspiring out there! And of course always a big thanks to the support systems out there cheering them all on! Your cheers of encouragement are the secret weapon that kept all the racers charging up those hills to the finish line! It would’ve been that much more mentally difficult out there without all of that positive energy to keep our athletes moving forward. Your cheers are what helped to give all the racers that boost when we really need it out there!
We look forward to seeing you all out there at the many races to come this season creating more fabulous memories!!!

SAC’s roster of speedy racers – keep up the great work!
½ Marathon:

  • Amanda Camp – 2:00:16 (9:11)
  • Chuck Cathey – 1:43:45 (7:55)
  • Bridget Jones Cressman – 1:35:24 (7:17)
  • Ethan Morris – 1:54:20 (8:44)
  • Patricia Nakamura – 1:51:12 (8:29)
  • Mike Podell – 1:31:25 (6:59)

10K:

  • Chad Baker – 49:51 (8:02)
  • Mark Longman – 52:16 (8:25)
  • Elizabeth Martin – 47:48 (7:42)
  • Kirsten Nesholm – 44:20 (7:08)
  • Lisa Ohge – 51:08 (8:14)
  • Tammi Westphal – 59:14 (9:32)

5K:

  • Teresa Nelson – 22:25 (7:14)

Hans Swim Paddles for the Triathlete and Master Swimmer

Hans Paddles:
The Han’s paddles (the small black ones) are smaller and are a great place to start when first using paddles. Because the Han’s paddle does not have a wrist strap it gives you immediate feedback as to whether you are swimming efficiently. If at any time the paddle is sliding on your hand it is telling you that you are not keeping adequate water resistance on your hand and are not propelling your bodyforward.

These can be worn in three different ways but the most popular is with the boxy end at the top of your fingers and the more curved end at the bottom (as illustrated).

This position teaches the hand, wrist, and elbow order of entry and encourages the downward sweep of the hand and high-elbows positioning in order to continually reach for “new” and “more” water with each stroke.

Strokemaker Paddles:
The Strokemaker paddle (which comes in various sizes and colors) is the bigger paddle that we offer. It increases distance per stroke by preventing you from allowing an early recovery (exiting arm from water). The size allows for strengthening of your swimming-specific muscles and aids in water propulsion. It is imperative that you do not take out the wrist tube in order to ensure proper use and to make sure you finish your stroke. You can use paddles in any stroke but be aware that the larger the paddle the more stress is put on your shoulder joint.

Make sure, if you start using paddles, to start out slowly. Only use them for 200-300 yards for the first few sessions and then build upon that. If you have any shoulder pain, stop. Start with the smaller paddles (ie: the black Han’s paddle or the green Strokemaker paddle) and build up. Most recreational swimmers should not go beyond the yellow Strokemaker paddle as the red (the largest we carry) is designed for elite swimmers or those that have been swimming with paddles for some time.