Tag: food

Special Occasions: 5 Tips to Stay on Track

1)     Enjoy the food and festivities.

This seems a given but we often berate ourselves while we could be celebrating! The more we enjoy life and create the experiences we want, the more energy we’ll have to focus on nourishing ourselves. In terms of food, pick those indulgences you really love and fore go the things that bring the calories without much enjoyment. If you have to drink or eat your way out of an event you really don’t want to go to – re-assess if it’s really worth it.

 

2)     Hydrate well and watch the booze.

The more we drink the more our inhibitions go down. And if we lose our mindfulness and inhibitions we’ll likely not remember all the good tips you’re about to read. Give yourself a 1-2 drink maximum and hydrate in between to prevent dehydration.

 

3)     Workout a bit more.

Exercise is the number one way to maintain your weight. As you mindfully enjoy special occasion foods push yourself the next workout to go an extra 15-30 minutes. Look for opportunities to walk more and take the stairs when you can. It all adds up to burning off those extra calories.

 

4)     Keep up on fruits and veggies.

 

With plenty of fiber – you’ll have less room for other things. It’s always better to focus on what you want more of than simply avoiding things you “shouldn’t” eat. Shoot to fill half your plate(s) with fruit and vegetables.

 

5)     Sleep at least 7 hours the night before.

 

If we get enough sleep we won’t be as tempted to indulge in the simple carbohydrates –sweets and bready things that are so abundant. If you’re too tired you’ll crave these things. Make your sleep a priority and you’ll be more equipped to healthful food choices.

 


For more information, please contact our Nutritionist, Kathryn Reed, MS, at kreed@sacdt.com.

Strategies for a Healthful Holiday

  1. Enjoy the food and festivities. This is number one above all else. The more you enjoy your life and create holiday experiences you want vs. being on automatic pilot dreading the various gatherings and traditions that you really don’t want to be a part of – the more energy you’ll have to focus on nourishing yourself. In terms of food, pick those indulgences you really love and forego the things that bring the calories without much enjoyment. If you have to drink or eat your way out of an event you really don’t want to go to – re-assess if it’s really worth it.
  2. Work out more. Exercise is the number one way to maintain your weight. As you mindfully enjoy holiday foods push yourself the next workout to go an extra 15-30 minutes. Look for opportunities to walk more and take the stairs when you can. It all adds up to burning off those extra calories. For most, delaying weight-loss goals to the month of January is more realistic.
  3. Stay hydrated and keep up on fruits and veggies.  With adequate hydration and plenty of fiber – you’ll have less room for other things. It’s always better to focus on what you want more of than simply avoiding things you “shouldn’t” eat.
  4.  Sleep at least 7 hours a night.  If we get enough sleep we won’t be as tempted to indulge in the simple carbohydrates –sweets and bready things that are so abundant during the holidays. If you’re too tired you’ll crave these things. Make your sleep a priority and you’ll be more equipped to make healthful food choices.

 

Here’s to a holiday season free of guilt and good care. My hope is that you don’t lose sight of one of the most important gifts you can give – your own health and well-being.

The Naturopathic Walk of Life

By Personal Fitness Trainer Amber Walz, Seattle Athletic Club Downtown

Many questions arise around naturopathic medicine. The creed, “do no harm,” is first and foremost. A licensed ND goes through a 4-year medical doctorate program at an accredited university and must pass national boards called NPLEX exams. Naturopaths operate on the holistic standard of treating the cause, not the symptom. Most of the time treatment of symptoms will not address the underlying issue. This is most obvious in cases of chronic illness; for example, if you have a client with diabetes who is treated with insulin, but not treated with nutritional guidelines and exercise, the symptoms are being treated yet not the cause. Naturopaths seek to restore and maintain optimum health in their patients by emphasizing nature’s self-healing process, the vis medicatrix naturae.

 

Food as medicine– Nutrition can be complex yet an amazing way to treat many conditions, correct deficiencies, discover intolerances, and balance energy. A naturopath will give nutritional guidance within their scope both as a medicine, as well as, diet.

Physical medicine- Physical medicine will increase longevity, and is used in treatment and upkeep of the physical body. Naturopathic medicine can encompass many forms of treatment depending on specialization of the practitioner.

Herbal medicine- Herbs and homeopathy are used in treatment to supplement or as an alternative to prescription medication. Most often the herbs will mimic the same biochemical pathway as the prescription option. Homeopathy is a method of treating like with like. Highly diluted substances are used to trigger the same symptoms and the body’s natural healing system as a response.

Counseling- The mind is as the body does. Naturopaths are trained to take into account quality of life, stress, and overall emotional health upon treatment. The counseling is limited to the practitioner’s specializations, yet it is always an element of treatment.

 

If you are curious about what a naturopath can offer, well, you are in the right place. Washington is one of the most progressive states related to naturopathic scope of practice. There is growing demand for integrative practices, which will lead to greater opportunity for research and development of this holistic field of medicine.

 

 

Organic and Sustainable Food

Organic
In order to be labeled “organic,” a product, its producer, and the farmer must meet the USDA’s organic standards and must be certified by a USDA-approved agency. Organic foods cannot be grown using synthetic fertilizers, chemicals, or sewage sludge, cannot be genetically modified, and cannot be irradiated. Organic meat and poultry must be fed only organically-grown feed (without any animal byproducts) and cannot be treated with hormones or antibiotics. Also the animals must have access to the outdoors.

Sustainable
A product can be considered sustainable if its production allows the resources from which it was made to continue to be available for future generations. A sustainable product can be created repeatedly without generating negative environmental effects, without causing waste products to accumulate as pollution, and without compromising the wellbeing of workers or communities. Many different agricultural techniques can be used to help make food production more sustainable. The drawback of the term ‘sustainable’ is that the term lacks a clear-cut, universally-accepted, enforceable definition. It is more of a philosophy or way of life than a label.

Reasons to Eat Organic and Sustainable Foods

  • Taste
    Many people buy organic food because they believe it tastes better than non-organic.
  • It’s healthier
    On average, organic food contains higher levels of vitamin C and essential minerals such as calcium, magnesium, iron and chromium as well as cancer-fighting antioxidants.
  • No harmful additives
    Out of hundreds of food additives approved for use, only 43 are permitted in organic food. Unlike additives used in non-organic food, none of the additives used in organic food production are considered harmful.
  • Avoids pesticides
    Organic growing practices prohibit synthetic insecticides, fungicides and herbicides used routinely on non-organic food crops. Many of the EPA-approved pesticides were registered long before research linked them to cancer and other diseases.
  • GM-free
    Genetically modified (GM) crops and ingredients are not allowed under organic standards.
  • Doesn’t rely on drugs
    Antibiotic additives routinely added to animal food to speed animal growth are linked with bacterial resistance in humans to the same or closely related antibiotics. USDA organic standards ban the use of antibiotics.
  • Protect farm worker health
    According to a National Cancer Institute study, farmers exposed to herbicides had a six-times greater risk than non-farmers of contracting cancer.
  • Good for wildlife and the environment
    Organic farming supports more wildlife than non-organic farming. It preserves biodiversity, reduces pollution from chemicals, and produces less carbon dioxide gas — the main global warming gas — with less dangerous waste.
  • Save energy
    Non-organic farming uses more petroleum than any other single industry. Organic farming relies mainly on labor-intensive practices such as hand weeding, green manures and crop covers rather than chemical fertilizers, improving the soil while saving energy.

You are What You Eat

Do you ever think to yourself, “I wonder if this bagel with cream cheese is a healthy way to start my day?” Well if you don’t you should, and if you don’t know the answer I’ll go ahead and give it to you, NO that is not a healthy way to start a day. So what should you eat instead? What justifies healthy food? So many questions but let’s just go over general guidelines.

  1. Real food. Real food is super important. Why should you eat a bag of chips with an ingredient list of 20+ items when you could make your own sweet potato chips at home? Check it out…

    Eat real, try to buy real food, the more processed the less healthy. But when you have to buy something in a package/can/bag/etc. pick the stuff with the least amount of ingredients and stuff that you know what it is!

  2. Less sugar! Have you looked at that bag of bagels you’ve been buying for the last year? How many grams of sugar are in there? Enough to constitute your little round treat as a slightly less offensive donut. Sugar raises your insulin levels and is readily stored as fat. Cut back on sugar, of all kinds. Agave nectar is still sugar, so is honey, so is fruit juice, so is cane sugar. They all get broken down in the body the same as fructose so don’t be fooled by the “healthy” stuff. Looking for a sweet snack, have an apple, try some dried apricots (NO sugar added), etc.
  3. Read your labels. It’s shocking to know what’s in your food. Processed this, sugar that, wheat, soy, etc, it’s a real eye opener. Read labels, find the ones that have the most natural ingredients. Make note of grams of sugar, grams of carbohydrates, and how many calories per serving. Know the serving size.
  4. Eat when you are hungry. Snacks are sold EVERYWHERE. You can’t even go to Home Depot without staring down Twix, Snickers, and Jolly Ranchers. Instead of eating junk, if you must have a snack be ready with natural food. 100 calorie packs of Almonds, some turkey jerky, a sting cheese. Don’t be tempted to eat just because it’s there. Make smart decisions when it comes to indulging.
  5. Cook at home! If you constantly eat out, lunch, dinner, weekend breakfast, make it a point to cook dinner at home once or more during the week. Find a fun recipe, go to the Market, buy local, involve your family. You may find that the extra effort makes it taste that much better!

These are just a few basic tips on ways to change to a healthier diet. If you would like more information on nutrition please contact our nutritionist Suzzanne Myer.